GLITTER

Glitter describes an assortment of very small, flat, reflective particles. When particles are applied to surfaces, they reflect light at different angles causing a surface to sparkle or shimmer. Glitter is similar to, but smaller than confetti or sequins. Glitter has been produced and used decoratively since prehistoric times from many different materials including stones such as malachite or mica  insects, and glass. Modern glitter is most commonly manufactured from plastic. Our model is Rebekah.

The modern word “glitter” comes from glitra in Old Norse through Middle English, However as early as 30,000 years ago, flake mica was used to give caves paintings a glittering appearance. Prehistoric humans are believed to have used cosmetics, which may have included powdered hematite, a sparkling mineral. Over 6,000 years ago, the ancient Egyptians produced glittering cosmetics from the iridescent shells of beetles as well as finely ground green malachite crystal. Researchers believe that Mayan temples were sometimes painted with red, green, and grey glitter paint made from mica dust, based on infrared scans of the remnants of paint still found on the structures.

glitterpuss

Glittering surfaces have been found to be used since prehistoric times in the arts and in cosmetics. Sparkling fabrics have come into fashion through the ages. Prior to fabrics made with modern glitter, sequins were sewn or woven onto fabric to give it a glittering appearance. Today, edible glitter made from gum arabic and other ingredients is even used by culinary artists.

glitterpuss

There are over 20,000 varieties of glitter manufactured in a vast number of different colors, sizes, and materials. Over 10,000,000 pounds (4,500,000 kg) of glitter was purchased between the years of 1989 and 2009 alone.

 

|M|akeup |P|hotography |H|air  +  Geino Äotsch

Text via Wikipedia

Glitter | Featuring: Rebekah Äotsch

geinos.com

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com